Tag Archives: Apache

LOGAS–Tweaked

Over the past week I’ve probably generated enough material for a half-dozen blog posts. However, since I have to get some billable hours in and invoices sent out this week, I’ll just post a short update for now on one aspect of project LOGAS. In my prior post I described the steps I took to get an Ubuntu based Apache/GeoServer up and running. Since then I’ve tweaked the process, and with a lot of help, been able to get everything in working order.

One of the roadblocks I faced was how to get Apache/Tomcat and GeoServer working together. Working individually was easy, together was not. As I progressed with my education in JavaScript, I ran into some cross-domain issues due to the fact my website and GeoServer were hosted on different machines. Even when I put them both on the same machine, the problems persisted due to the fact the webserver  and the the map server use different ports (Apache – 80, and GeoServer – 8080). The solution turned out to be setting up a proxy server. Sounds easy. It was not.

After banging my head on the problem to the point of near concussion, a few online cohorts came to my rescue; in particular, @spara. She was generous enough to write up a script that installs Apache and the OpenGeo Suite, and configures Tomcat and the rest in a way that makes them all work together. She’s posted the code on github for anyone to use. Note: My previous post installed a full LAMP system. This one is limited to just Apache and the OpenGeo Suite, with some tweaks to the Tomcat servlet configuration.

I’ve tested her script on a few clean Ubuntu 10.10 setups, but I haven’t been able to get it to work as a single copy/paste yet. For me, it’s still a multi-step process. But, it does work and it is about as painless as it gets. What works consistently for me, is performing the OpenGeo Suite install first, and then running the Apache install/Tomcat configuration separately.

OpenGeo Suite

So far, the only process that works consistently for me is to first sudo to root, then setup the repository and install the OpenGeo suite. Start by typing the following into a terminal window:


sudo su


… hit enter, and enter your password.

Then copy and paste the following into terminal:


wget -qO- http://apt.opengeo.org/gpg.key | apt-key add -

echo “deb http://apt.opengeo.org/ubuntu lucid main” >> /etc/apt/sources.list

apt-get update

apt-cache search opengeo

apt-get install opengeo-suite


After OpenGeo finishes installing, it will ask for a proxy URL (just leave it blank and hit enter unless you know what that means), a user name, and a password. Set these up as you wish. When all that’s done, move on the the next step.

Apache/Tomcat

Here’s the script for the Apache install/Tomcat setup, just copy and paste this into a terminal window:



sudo apt-get install -y apache2
sudo ln -s /etc/apache2/mods-available/proxy.conf /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/proxy.conf
sudo ln -s /etc/apache2/mods-available/proxy.load /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/proxy.load
sudo ln -s /etc/apache2/mods-available/proxy_http.load /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/proxy_http.load
sudo chmod 666 /etc/apache2/sites-available/default
sudo sed -i '$d'  /etc/apache2/sites-available/default
sudo sh -c "echo ' ' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyRequests Off' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo '# Remember to turn the next line off if you are proxying to a NameVirtualHost' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPreserveHost On' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo ' ' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo '<Proxy *>' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo '    Order deny,allow' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo '    Allow from all' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo '</Proxy>' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo ' ' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPass /geoserver http://localhost:8080/geoserver' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPassReverse /geoserver http://localhost:8080/geoserver' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPass /geoexplorer http://localhost:8080/geoexplorer' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPassReverse /geoexplorer http://localhost:8080/geoexplorer' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPass /geoeditor http://localhost:8080/geoeditor' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPassReverse /geoeditor http://localhost:8080/geoeditor' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPass /geowebcache http://localhost:8080/geowebcache' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPassReverse /geowebcache http://localhost:8080/geowebcache' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPass /dashboard http://localhost:8080/dashboard' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPassReverse /dashboard http://localhost:8080/dashboard' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPass /recipes http://localhost:8080/recipes' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo 'ProxyPassReverse /recipes http://localhost:8080/recipes' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo ' ' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo sh -c "echo '</VirtualHost>' >> /etc/apache2/sites-available/default"
sudo chmod 644 /etc/apache2/sites-available/default


This installs Apache, and configures it and Tomcat so it appears as though your website and all of the OpenGeo Suite apps are using the same port. The last thing to do is test everything as I outlined in my previous post.

Test the Apache2 default website:

on the host computer – http://localhost – It works!
and via a remote computer (substitute your server’s domain here) – http://24.105.210.45/ – It works!

Test the OpenGeo Suite:

Open the dashboard – http://localhost:8080/dashboard/
Launch GeoExplorer
Save the default map and exit GeoExplorer

Test GeoServer by loading a GeoExplorer map:

Open the default map on a remote computer (again, substitute your server’s domain here) – http://24.105.210.45:8080/geoexplorer/viewer#maps/1

If everything is set up correctly, you should see something like this:

OpenGeoExplorerView

There are probably a few more tweaks that can be made to this process, but I don’t know enough about how Ubuntu works yet to make those changes. I do know that this process works most of the time. A restart between processes helps sometimes, and trying them in a different order occasionally works, too. If anyone can come up with a better, more streamlined approach, please feel free to let me know about it. For now, I’ll just have to live with a little complexity.

And in honor of the day, a little more cow bell, too –

LOGAS–Linux OpenGeo Apache Server

Moving the GeoSandbox to Full OpenSource

I’ve run into a couple of roadblocks recently, regarding my experiments with my GeoSandbox. I want to be able to play with some of of the JavaScript libraries available, so I can continue my education on those fronts. Some cross domain issues arose when I started putting JavaScript in my web pages as my website is on a different server than is my GeoServer. So, that means learning some more about setting up web servers and how proxy servers work. Also, my old Dell 600m is starting to feel the effects of the increased demands placed on it as the GeoSandbox becomes more popular, and more complex. That means an eventual move onto a cloud server. Since cloud servers running an open source OS are much less expensive than those running Windows, I felt the need to begin transferring my entire setup over to open source tools.

For now, I’m just going to do a short outline of what it took to get a basic Ubuntu/Apache/OpenGeo Suite operating on my home server. Once I get a better handle on how Ubuntu and Apache work I’ll add some posts about that.

Starting with a clean install of Ubuntu 10.10

Download and install Ubuntu 10.10 Desktop

I downloaded Ubuntuu 10.10 Desktop Edition from their website:

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download

Yes, I could have used the Server edition, but Coming from a Windows world, It’s easier for me to work with some kind of GUI than to go 100% command line. After downloading the .iso, I burned it to a CD, installed it on a clean hard drive, and then installed all updates.

Turn Ubuntu Desktop into an Apache Server

Install LAMP with a single command

In case you didn’t know, LAMP stands for “Linux Apache MySQL PHP”. This may or may not be more than I need for my purposes, but a one-line install looked like the easiest way to go, so:

http://nick.onetwenty.org/index.php/2010/12/02/installing-lamp-server-on-ubuntu-10-10-desktop/

Then I opened a terminal window and entered:

sudo apt-get install lamp-server^

Add in the ability to serve maps

Install OpenGeo Suite

This was the most difficult part for me to figure out. Instructions can be found here:

http://projects.opengeo.org/suite/wiki/LinuxPackages

Being somewhat new to Ubuntu, I missed what the first step under “Repository Setup” meant (sudo to root). Once I figured that out, things went smoothly. The steps are:

In terminal, sudo to root:

sudo su

Import the OpenGeo gpg key:

wget -qO- http://apt.opengeo.org/gpg.key | apt-key add -

Add the OpenGeo repository:

echo "deb http://apt.opengeo.org/ubuntu lucid main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list

Update the package list:

apt-get update

Search for OpenGeo packages:

apt-cache search opengeo

Install the OpenGeo Suite package:

apt-get install opengeo-suite

Restart Ubuntu

See if everything works

The last step was to see if everything was working properly, which it was.

Test the Apache2 default website:

on the host computer – http://localhost – It works!
and via a remote computer (substitute your server’s domain here) – http://24.105.210.45/ – It works!

Test the OpenGeo Suite:

Open the dashboard – http://localhost:8080/dashboard/
Launch GeoExplorer
Save the default map and exit Geoexplorer

Test GeoServer by loading a GeoExplorer map:

Open the default map on a remote computer (again, substitute your server’s domain here) – http://24.105.210.45:8080/geoexplorer/viewer#maps/1

In my case, everything worked as expected. After this, I continued trying to set up a custom website to serve my GeoServer maps, but ran into a few problems. I’ll be switching the GeoSandbox back and forth between the Windows and Apache server as I continue my climb up the learning curve, so don’t be surprised if some of the links appear to be broken on occasion.